Sunday, March 24, 2013

Weather report from Liverpool,Nova Scotia,Canada

(Temps are in °C)
Conditions on my station in Liverpool,N.S. at 7:05 AM:
Air Temp: -1.0
Conditions:mostly cloudy w/flurries
Windchill:-3.6
Humidity: 81%
Wind: 7.3 km/h W
Pressure: 986 mb
Min / max over the past 24 hours:
High: 5.6
Low:  -4.3


Latest conditions reported from the local OFFICIAL weather station at
Western Head,N.S. :
0 °C
Snow
Windchill: -4 °C
Humidity: 94%
Wind: 9 km/h West
Wind Gust: km/h
Dew Point: -1 °C
Pressure: 998 hPa (Rising)
Updated: 6:00 AM ADT on March 24, 2013

Record values for today:
Highest Temperature (1960-2012) 13.9°C 1974
Lowest Temperature (1960-2012) -9.7°C 1997
Greatest Precipitation (1960-2012) 17.3mm 1967
Greatest Rainfall (1960-1975) 10.7mm 1961
Greatest Snowfall (1960-1975) 15.0cm 1967
Most Snow on the Ground (1960-2007) 23.0cm 1971
................................................
Yesterday was a mix of sun and cloud with some flurries.Temps were mild so
there was no accumulation.There was little change in the evening with temps
slightly below freezing.More flurries are expected again today.

Today's Forecast:
Today..Mainly cloudy. 60 percent chance of flurries changing to
60 percent chance of rain showers or flurries near noon. Wind
northwest 20 km/h becoming light this afternoon. High plus 4. UV
index 3 or moderate.
Tonight..Partly cloudy. 30 percent chance of flurries this evening.
Low minus 4.
Monday..A mix of sun and cloud. Wind becoming northeast 20 km/h in
the evening. High plus 5.

Marine Forecast:
Wind westerly 20 to 25 knots veering to northwest 15 to 20 this
afternoon then diminishing to northwest 10 to 15 this evening. Wind
diminishing to light overnight then increasing to northeast 20
Monday evening. Chance of flurries or showers today and this
evening.

 Today's weather trivia: 24 March 2010: Sea ice along Newfoundland and
Labrador¿s Northern Peninsula coastline broke up and blew out to sea,
leaving many dead seal pups in its wake. The lack of sea ice in the northern
Gulf of St. Lawrence had driven thousands of seals onto the shore-fast ice
and beach to give birth. The young shore-bound seals had become a
sightseeing attraction and an easy meal for bald eagles, coyotes, and foxes.
Excerpt from 'The Canadian Weather Trivia Calendar' by David Phillips. ©
Environment Canada

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